About Rolex Milgauss

The Rolex Milgauss was first introduced in 1956 to meet the growing need for a watch able to maintain accurate timekeeping in the face of the strong magnetic fields encountered in the scientific community. Named for its ability to withstand magnetic fields of up to 1,000 gauss, the watch contains a Faraday cage which encloses the movement and is capable of cancelling out all but the strongest fields.

The watch became known notable as the watch worn by scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland. Due to relatively low demand and sales, the model was finally discontinued in 1988. These early models have become sought after by collectors because of their rarity and have sold at auction for astronomical prices.

The current generation Milgauss, introduced in 2007 features the same Faraday cage and the lightning bolt second hand of the original model. This model was the first to feature Rolex's Parachrom Blue hairspring, a hairspring made from a non-magnetic material. A green tinted crystal (unique to the Milgauss) can be found on some uncommon black dial models.